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NEoN Digital Arts Festival

8 November 2015 until 14 November 2015
across the city of Dundee

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NEoN, Scotland’s only digital arts festival, is heading North East of North Asia to bring the best of digital and electronic art from Japan, China, Hong Kong, Korea, and Taiwan to the city of Dundee from the 8th-14th November 2015.

The full programme is online at http://www.northeastofnorth.com/programme/

Coming to Scotland to showcase their work are: artist Ei Wada (Japan), artist Eric Siu (Hong Kong), performance duo Usaginingen (Shin and Emi Hirai) (Japan, living in Berlin), artist and filmmaker Shu Lea Cheang (Taiwan, living in Paris), artist TaeYoon Choi (Korea, living in New York), artist Yin-Ju Chen (Taiwan), and artist group IDPW (Japan).

Artists working in the UK whose works are included in the Festival and will be participating in exhibitions and the symposium include Ah-bin Shim (Korea, living in Edinburgh), Manny Ling (Hong Kong living in the northeast of England), and Jung In Jung (China, living in Edinburgh).

Video or electronic art in the screening programmes includes work by Mineo Aayamaguchi (Japan), Akiko Hada (Japan, living in Berlin), Sun Xun (China), Xin Ding (China), Michelle Lee Proksell (China), Lang Tu (Hong Kong), Wang Xin (China), Lulu Li (China), Ophelia S. Chan (Hong Kong).

The Festival includes exhibitions, outdoor projections, screenings, performances, workshops, artist talks in PechaKucha form, an academic mini symposium and even an Internet flea market.

Asia – home to two-thirds of the world’s population, has given us K-pop (Gangnam Style, the world’s most watched music video), Godzilla, the Sony Walkman, and the father of media art, Nam June Paik. There is extraordinary richness in contemporary digital artistic practice. Japan has imbued art with the idea of wabi-sabi, of accepting flux and impermanence, which fits well with digital art, that is constantly changing in response to its media and context. Japan has also given us the idea of kawaii, or cuteness, which figures in our relationship to our technological devices. Japanese popular culture dominates the West’s views of the East’s aesthetics, but NEoN seeks to cast a wider net across northern Asia to consider other nation’s digital creativity, including device art, sound, installation art, design, games, moving image, animation, net art and performance.

Links

NEoN Festival Programme

Themes

Posted by: Sarah Cook

NEoN Digital Arts Festival poster

NEoN Digital Arts Festival poster